Archive for the 'Art' Category

Thesis Presentation

Scrape

Scrape is an exploration of information privacy focusing on the graphical data that is left behind on a computer.

All computers store visual data. A computer’s graphics card is recording a history of all recent activity on the machine. The core of Scrape is a custom software application that retrieves the data from a computer graphics card, interprets it, and represents it visually. This creates a beautiful, abstract mosaic of sometimes chaotic and sometimes recognizable tiles of information.

The software is used in the three projects that make up Scrape: an interactive installation uncovering traces left behind when using a public computer, an online social network rethinking the concept of constant status updates, and an exhibit of prints using information as a drawing medium.

On one hand, Scrape is a reminder of the amount of trust we put into computers. On the other, the project exposes the tell-all attitude characterizing our online social interaction. Scrape explores these themes through a re-interpretation of data, using information as a medium for creating beautiful visual compositions.

Read the Thesis Paper

Thesis Week

I will be presenting my thesis project, Scrape, on Friday May 7 at 1:40pm. The graduating class at ITP will be presenting their theses all week. For more information, see itp.nyu.edu/shows/thesis2010.

Two of the Scrape modules, the interactive installation and the exhibit of large format prints, will be on display throughout the week at ITP.

Scrape Network

The Scrape Network is live!

Once you make an account, you can download the desktop agent and run it on your computer (OS X 10.5+ only for now). The agent allows you to scrape your graphics card manually or at random intervals. You can then save the generated images on disk or upload them to the Scrape site. You can also set Scrape to automatically post your “computation state” to Twitter.

Scrape

As I was not fully satisfied with any of the ideas for thesis projects I have had so far, I have decided to move forward with an idea I have had for a while now: Scrape.

Scrape is an art piece that explores information privacy by focusing on the graphical data that is left behind on a computer. All computers store visual data. The graphics card is basically recording a history of all recent activity on the machine. The core of Scrape is a custom software that retrieves the data from a computer graphics card at regular intervals. This found data is interpreted and represented visually, creating a beautiful, abstract mosaic of sometimes chaotic and sometimes recognizable tiles of information. Continue reading ‘Scrape’

3D Navigation w/ iPhone

A rough sketch where I am navigating in a 3D world using the iPhone as an interface. Tilting the phone moves the camera and dragging on the screen rotates it (similarly to how mouse look works in FPS games).

The communication with the iPhone is done through OSC using Mrmr on the phone and OscP5 on the laptop. The 3D environment was built with JOCode for Processing, an OpenGL framework I have been working on with Mark Napier. We are in the process of finalizing the library and it will be available within the next two weeks.

ezGestures chapter in Programming Interactivity

Joshua Noble‘s latest book, Programming Interactivity, has a whole section on ezGestures, my gesture recognition library for Processing. I haven’t tried the example yet but it uses a camera and looks fancy…

Slow-Motion Videos

I haven’t posted in a while, but it doesn’t mean I haven’t been busy. A lot of work (which I can’t talk about right now), and also a lot of messing around with the Casio EX-F1 slow-motion camera.


Continue reading ‘Slow-Motion Videos’

Interview on Ça manque à ma culture

Hugues (aka smallfly) and I did an interview last Monday for an online show on Télé-Québec called Ça manque à ma culture. I’m impressed at how well it turned out considering that we were mumbling and going off on tangents for the entire duration of the interview.

Watch it here.

Auto Suggestion II

An antique metal library card catalogue embedded with a series of ultra bright LEDs, which signal in binary code any time a source word from a database of terms is found while searching through a large aggregate of world news feeds. The words used are “missing, disappeared, lost, absence…” and so on, all realting to the theme of missing persons, and the lights blink out the word found after the systems conversion of the adjective to its binary equivalent.

See http://www.teleshadow.net/autosuggestionII/ for more information.

IMG_1452 IMG_1461

A project by Brad Todd with Elie Zananiri.